Tag Archives: Alexander Technique stress management

Online Alexander Technique Lessons

Online Alexander Technique lessons now available * Six Free Online Lessons for NHS Staff

With Covid-19 and lockdown still in force, I am now offering online 1:1 lessons. These also allow people outside my local area the chance of learning something about the Alexander Technique.

Alexander lessons offer you self-help skills you can use throughout life.  You can learn to let go of old habits, move mindfully, relax and reduce problems such as neck and back pain – plus better manage stress in these challenging times.

 

In traditional Alexander lessons, teachers communicate their directions to clients through their hands, as well as with their words. Obviously this is not possible at the moment, so I am reducing fees by 20% for online sessions. There will also be an initial 30 minute session for free, so that the basics can be gone through.

Once lockdown restrictions have been lifted, you will have a chance to continue with normal Alexander Technique lessons in Harringay N4. These would be at the usual price.

Six Free Online Lessons for NHS Staff

I would also like to offer NHS staff six free lessons, to thank them for their heroic work during this pandemic and to help them cope with all the stress they are experiencing.  Just contact me using an NHS email address.

Contact  me to enquire about booking a session

Learning Resources – Website Articles and Glossary 

Alongside Alexander lessons, my website offers a range of resources to support your learning:

Why I Trained as an Alexander Teacher

The Ballet Years

 
I had lessons in classical ballet from the age of 5 and serious training began from the age of 11 when I became a boarder at the Royal Ballet School. It was sometimes wildly exciting and it was great to visit the Royal Opera House, sometimes sitting in the Royal Box during rehearsals! But life was very pressurised and quite stressful – I was put on diets to slim down and I acquired strains to my achilles and lower back, as I tried (too) hard to increase my flexibility. My body was always under examination and deemed to be lacking and, looking back, I can understand that it didn’t seem to belong to me. However, in my late teens I was accepted into the Sadler’s Wells Opera Ballet (now ENO) where I happily performed for a number of years. I met my opera-singer husband and first heard about the Alexander Technique there but sadly did not have AT lessons then as they would have helped me.
 
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Hilary King performing with Sadlers Wells Opera, Welsh National Opera and BBC TV 
 
Build-up of Stress
 
Rolling on some years, I gave up dancing so that I could be where my husband worked 
(as women still tended to do back then). I had children, got divorced and then my ex moved abroad. I needed to re-train so I could earn some money. I studied for a degree majoring in Psychology and was in one of the last groups of people that were truly fortunate to be able to study for free. 
The degree was hard to do as a mature student and single parent with 2 small children – then my mother died suddenly of a heart attack. Life had become extremely stressful and I was concerned that if I went on my health would deteriorate and I would end up like my mother.
Then I discovered that one of my Psychology lecturers, Peter Ribeaux, also taught the Alexander Technique at college, so I dived in and took AT lessons. I began to gain tools that I could use to calm myself down and clear my head. I studied better, got better marks and was less cranky with my long-suffering children. Learning and using the lying down procedure in particular helped transform me, as it gave me an immediate tool to help myself with. The AT work also helped me with my old back strain and I learned to listen to my body, ‘regaining’ it and discovering what it needed, rather than my just trying to make it perform for me – as I had been trained to do all through those ballet years.
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Semi-Supine Emergency Kit!
 
I gained my degree – just missing a first – which was sad but also wonderful, as I’d not even had any A levels, because ballet dancers were not deemed to have brains in those days and we did not have that option at the RBS. I then explored the idea of training in dance therapy and did some psychotherapy training but finally decided to train as an Alexander teacher, because I was so impressed by the hugely beneficial changes that had come about in me through having AT lessons.
I commenced my training at the Ribeaux school and completed it at the North London Teacher Training Course run by Misha Magidov, qualifying in 1987. I have had many happy years of teaching and am very grateful that I’ve been able to work in such a wonderful discipline that helps me look after myself in both my my mind and body, as I teach others how to do the same.